Renowned Tewksbury sculptor trades his cut for a pen

Mico Kaufman of Tewksbury points out some of his sculptures that he has in his Tewksbury home. He has combined a book, quot;A Chiselers True
Mico Kaufman of Tewksbury points out some of his sculptures that he has in his Tewksbury home. He has combined a book, “A Chiseler’s True Story,” about his life and work. Watch video during lowellsun.com. SUN/Caley McGuane

Sun staff photos can be systematic by visiting a SmugMug site.

TEWKSBURY – Mico Kaufman always had a robe of starting one plan and jumping to another before completing it, and afterwards starting a third while he was during it.

While gripping bustling sculpting statues and medallions, and gripping his records on a routine in a diary, friends suspicion a world-renowned sculptor would never be means to lay down and write his autobiography, a demeanour during his life and a art he’s created. But Kaufman, 92, finally did it and recently released, “A Chiseler’s True Story.”

The scarcely 400-page book chronicles Kaufman’s life flourishing adult in Romania, emigrating to a United States and Tewksbury, and, of course, operative during his No. 1 passion as a sculptor. Photos of Kaufman’s sculptures are accompanied by his remarks and musings on art and life.

Mico Kaufmans quot;Homage to Womenquot; statue in a Market Mills Courtyard in downtown Lowell total prominently in a book. His reverence to
Mico Kaufman’s “Homage to Women” statue in a Market Mills Courtyard in downtown Lowell total prominently in a book. His reverence to a Mill Girls was primarily controversial. Sun record photo

Sun staff photos can be systematic by visiting a SmugMug site.

There are also portions combined by his messenger of about 40 years, Elsie Howell. “He has talked about essay this book for during slightest a final 20 years,” Howell, of Tewksbury, said. Illustrated with some-more than 300 images of his work, a book gives an insinuate demeanour during Kaufman’s tie with art, and has a hold of humor. For example, during a finish of a book’s initial paragraph, Kaufman includes a self-portrait with a caption, “Feel I’m removing older, and did not wish to skip revelation it.”

“Afew years ago, we stopped all a sculpting work to finish (the book),” Kaufman pronounced during his home on Sunday. “I interrupted myself even as we motionless to do this.”

Kaufman pronounced he wanted to emanate an journal to share his life practice with others; it’s a tour he suspicion was interesting.


Advertisement


“I am usually thrilled,” pronounced Howell, 91, looking during Kaufman with far-reaching eyes. “Everything that is in there is what he wanted.” Kaufman was innate in 1924 in Buzau, Romania. He survived forced labor during World War II, complicated sculpture during a Academy of

Fine Arts in Rome, and immigrated to a United States in 1951. He became a U.S. citizen in 1956. Kaufman has sculpted work as high as 20 feet tall, yet also has tiny pieces and medallions that can simply be hold by hand.

Mico Kaufman looks over some-more of his sculptures that he keeps in his home. SUN/Caley McGuaneSun staff photos can be systematic by visiting a SmugMug site.
Mico Kaufman looks over some-more of his sculptures that he keeps in his home. SUN/Caley McGuane

Sun staff photos can be systematic by visiting a SmugMug site.

Much of his work is in bronze, yet he has also worked with gold, china and pewter. That learned crafting has warranted Kaufman countless awards and recognition, including a inventory in “Who’s Who in American Art” from 1970 to a present, honors from a National Society of Literature and Art, and a James McNeill Whistler House Distinguished Artist Award. Kaufman has sculptures in open collections in a U.S., England and Greece, and in many private collections via 4 continents. He is a usually sculptor to accept commissions to pattern 4 central initial medals: Gerald Ford’s clamp presidential and presidential medals; Ronald Reagan’s presidential medal, that Reagan sat for with Kaufman; and George H.W. Bush’s presidential medal.

Mico Kaufman says if his initial book is successful he might write another.SUN/Caley McGuaneSun staff photos can be systematic by visiting a SmugMug site.
Mico Kaufman says if his initial book is successful he might write another. SUN/Caley McGuane

Sun staff photos can be systematic by visiting a SmugMug site.

Pictures of Kaufman with a 3 presidents are displayed in “A Chiseler’s True Story.”

Though it took time, Kaufman pronounced essay a book wasn’t a challenge.

“To be honest, it wasn’t tough during all,” he said, sitting during his kitchen list with a winter top covering a tops of his ears, yet withdrawal his conference aids exposed. “Sometimes, we consider it’s some-more humorous to consider about what a politicians we wrote about would think.” Kaufman walked solemnly by his home, revelation stories about some of his favorite medallions and lead sculptures, memories from his years of creations still neatly intact. With vast hands that uncover age from decades of prudent carving, he showed off tiny versions of some of his Tewksbury statues, like “Water,” a sculpture of Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller, and a Wamesit Indian.

Mico Kaufman shows a caller some of a photos of his works that seem in his book. SUN/Caley McGuaneSun staff photos can be systematic by visiting our
Mico Kaufman shows a caller some of a photos of his works that seem in his book. SUN/Caley McGuane

Sun staff photos can be systematic by visiting a SmugMug site.

He finished a book a few months ago, and it can be purchased for $55 on Amazon.com.

Kaufman pronounced his journal doesn’t follow each partial of his life, or each sculpture, yet embellishes on a practice he suspicion were a many poignant.

“Some of a things that we remember stay with we some-more than others,” he said. One distinguished partial of his book facilities sum on his “Homage to Women” statue, a description of Lowell’s Mill Girls that is located during a dilemma of Market and Shattuck streets in downtown Lowell.

Kaufman pronounced former U.S. Sen. Paul Tsongas of Lowell was instrumental in removing a plan completed. At a time, people were repelled during a thought of carrying a work of art that featured usually women and no man, Kaufman recalled.

“The theme was, and is, dear to me,” Kaufman wrote in his book, “and we was many propitious to have Senator Paul Tsongas on a side of women, yet during a time, a opinion of many was that to concede this monument, was simply blasphemous.” Because of a significance of that sculpture, Kaufman has a print of himself with a work on a book’s behind cover.

Connecting with unchanging people was always a source of inspiration, Kaufman said. It was something that shabby his art. “I usually like to describe to people,” Kaufman said.

The sculptor pronounced he believes that people consider of statues as fight generals on horses. But he never felt prone to concentration his qualification on such a subject.

“That is a final thing we would do,” he said.

Kaufman pronounced he lives a elementary life. For now, he is going to wait to see if his book is successful. “If it’s successful, I’ll do it again,” he said.

Follow Melissa Hanson on Twitter and Tout @Melissa__Hanson.

_______

Mico Kaufman pronounced one of a reasons he motionless to settle in Tewksbury on entrance to a United States was since a city had small open art on display.

Now decades later, Kaufman has done a handful of statues that can be found via Tewksbury and in adjacent communities, such as:

-”Water,” a sculpture of Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller, Tewksbury Town Hall.

- World War II Memorial, Town Hall Common, Tewksbury.

- Blessed Eugene de Mazenod, Novitiate Seminary, Tewksbury.

- The Wamesit Indian, Wamesit Park, Route 38, Tewksbury.

- “The Muster,” South Tewksbury glow station.

- “Touching Souls,” Tewksbury United Methodist Church.

- The Rouses Memorial, John F. Kennedy Civic Plaza, in front of a Lowell military station.

- Blessed Eugene de Mazenod during St. Joseph of a Worker Shrine, Lowell.

- “Homage to Women,” during Lowell National Historical Park.

- James McNeill Whistler, Whistler House, Lowell.

- Claude Debussy, a French composer, UMass Lowell.

- Italia, John F. Kennedy Civic Plaza, Lowell.

And if we take a outing to Europe, Kaufman’s work can be seen in England, France and Greece.

Follow Melissa Hanson on Twitter and Tout @Melissa__Hanson.

This entrance upheld by a Full-Text RSS use – if this is your calm and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, greatfully review a FAQ during fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Curated By Logo